U.S. attempted to block United Nations resolution promoting breastfeeding

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NEW YORK (WCMH) — A New York Times report says United States officials attempted to block a recent U.N. resolution promoting the benefits of breastfeeding. 

According to the New York Times, the United Nations World Health Assembly was gathered last spring to pass a resolution stating that a mother’s milk is the healthiest for newborns.

It appeared the resolution was easily going to pass when the U.S. delegation stepped in due to the interests of infant formula manufacturers, the Times reports. 

U.S. officials wanted to remove language in the resolution which called on governments to promote breast feeding and restrict the promotion of products which may have damaging effects on children. 

The New York Times reports that U.S. officials even bullied other nations to side with them over the issue. 

“What happened was tantamount to blackmail, with the U.S. holding the world hostage and trying to overturn nearly 40 years of consensus on best way to protect infant and young child health,” Patti Rundall, policy director of the British advocacy group Baby Milk Action, told the Times. 

However, the resolution did eventually pass when Russia stepped in and introduced the measure. 

NEW YORK (WCMH) — A New York Times report says United States officials attempted to block a recent U.N. resolution promoting the benefits of breastfeeding. 

According to the New York Times, the United Nations World Health Assembly was gathered last spring to pass a resolution stating that a mother’s milk is the healthiest for newborns.

It appeared the resolution was easily going to pass when the U.S. delegation stepped in due to the interests of infant formula manufacturers, the Times reports. 

U.S. officials wanted to remove language in the resolution which called on governments to promote breast feeding and restrict the promotion of products which may have damaging effects on children. 

The New York Times reports that U.S. officials even bullied other nations to side with them over the issue. 

“What happened was tantamount to blackmail, with the U.S. holding the world hostage and trying to overturn nearly 40 years of consensus on best way to protect infant and young child health,” Patti Rundall, policy director of the British advocacy group Baby Milk Action, told the Times. 

However, the resolution did eventually pass when Russia stepped in and introduced the measure. 

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