(ABC4) – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the percentage of out-of-hospital deliveries increased from 1.26 percent of all U.S. births in 2011 to 1.36 percent in 2012.

Fast forward to 2020 and you’ll see the number of women giving birth at home increased by 22% during the first year of the pandemic. Home births remained relatively steady during the first three months of 2020 before rising quickly starting in April.

This chart shows the increase in home birth rates nationwide from 2019.

Month% change in home births from 2019
January-4%
February1%
March5%
April23%
May45%
June26%
July26%
August26%
September30%
October28%
November31%
December39%

The nationwide increase in home birth has been particularly pronounced in several states. Home births increased by 68% in South Dakota, 64% in South Carolina and by more than 30% in 11 states. New Hampshire is the only state that saw a decline in home births during 2020.

But where does Utah stand when it comes to homebirth statistics?

According to newly released report by QuoteWizard, home births have increased by 20% in Utah since 2019.

When it comes to homebirths, woman have the options of choosing to go with a doula, a professional trained in childbirth who provides emotional, physical, and educational support to a mother who is expecting, is experiencing labor, or has recently given birth, or a midwife, who unlike doulas, are trained medical professionals.

Why have homebirths increased in Utah?

The rise in home births in Utah is a direct result of the pandemic, according to the report. The report found that concerns over getting COVID-19 at the hospital, hospital lockdowns and fears of family separation all contributed to more mothers choosing to give birth at home.

How much does it cost to have an at-home birth?

Many pregnant women choose home birth so they can bypass the sky-high bills associated with most hospital births. A home birth costs around $3,000 less which is about 60% less than what you’ll pay if you give birth in a hospital.

Families sometimes have to pay all of that amount out of pocket whether they have insurance or not because a number of U.S. insurers hesitate when it comes to covering planned home births.

They consider home births to be “not medically appropriate.” They also often consider them to be risky.

Here is where Utah stands in home births compared to the rest of the U.S.

State% change in home births from 2019
Alabama37%
Alaska13%
Arizona36%
Arkansas12%
California23%
Colorado21%
Connecticut29%
Delaware49%
Florida25%
Georgia29%
Hawaii28%
Idaho13%
Illinois29%
Indiana17%
Iowa19%
Kansas14%
Kentucky21%
Louisiana27%
Maine23%
Maryland38%
Massachusetts47%
Michigan33%
Minnesota21%
Mississippi26%
Missouri28%
Montana9%
Nebraska16%
Nevada8%
New Hampshire-1%
New Jersey36%
New Mexico34%
New York31%
North Carolina22%
North Dakota15%
Ohio21%
Oklahoma10%
Oregon16%
Pennsylvania13%
Rhode Island49%
South Carolina65%
South Dakota68%
Tennessee20%
Texas20%
Utah20%
Vermont30%
Virginia24%
Washington25%
West Virginia5%
Wisconsin11%
Wyoming14%
United States22%