UPDATE: Mill Creek stream cleared for public use following concrete spill

Local News

UPDATE: MONDAY 8/2/21 5:44 P.M.

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Transportation says the Mill Creek Stream is now safe for public use following a large concrete spill last week.

Cleanup crews have now removed sixty 50-gallon bags of potentially contaminated material from the stream located west of I-215 to at least 700 East. The spill increased PH levels in the stream that can cause skin irritation.

UPDATE: SATURDAY 7/31/21 10:22 A.M.

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) provided an update on their cleanup efforts after concrete spilled into Mill Creek Stream Friday.

According to a tweet from UDOT, crews have recovered twenty 50-gallon bags of potentially contaminated material, such as direct, rocks, etc.

“What we do know is between 2-5 cubic yards of concrete spilled into the stream,” UDOT said Saturday morning.

All people and pets are advised to stay out of the water and away from Mill Creek Stream west of I-215 to 700 East.

An investigation on how the spill happened is ongoing.

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SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) is warning the public to keep living things out of the water at Mill Creek Stream after a concrete spill.

“It is imperative that humans and pets stay out of the water and away from Mill Creek Stream,” UDOT said in a tweet.

The stream is located west of I-215 to at least 700 East. The spill increased PH levels in the stream that can cause skin irritation.

After the spill, Patrick Fink, who lives along the creek described the water as “chalk white” and said as crews began cleaning up last night, he watched as the creek was flushed with a large volume of water, which brought a number of dead fish downstream.

“It’s flushed a lot of dead fish, detritus downstream, but there’s still kind of a murky haze to the water and a lot of new sandbars and a lot of silt material that wasn’t there previously,” he said.

Cleanup efforts may take a week, said Ashley Sumner, the director of the Utah Department of Environmental Quality.

“This is something that we can’t just catch with a net. So, we’re using barriers, and working on other strategies that can sort of contain, and then we can scoop it out of the water,” she said.

Sumner continued to tell ABC4 News they will be intensively monitoring the entire cleanup process.

“Obviously visually, taking samples, assessing the water to ensure that it’s cleaned up and protected to ensure the environment is protected,” she said.

John Gleason, a UDOT spokesperson, said every project they do has a stormwater protection plan to ensure harmful pollutants do not get into the water. As to how the accident happened, Gleason said an investigation is underway.

UDOT, DEQ, and Salt Lake County Health Department are currently on scene and working to resolve the situation. Anyone with questions or concerns can call 844-909-3278.

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