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Kissing study shows difference in male and female brainwaves

UVU conducts kissing study with newlyweds

OREM, Utah (ABC4 News) - When it comes to kissing, men and women are not on the same wavelength. A study conducted by the Utah Valley University Neuromarketing Research SMARTLab shows men and women approach a kiss differently and don't kiss in the same way. 

The UVU researchers say the scientific findings were actually surprising. Dr. Paul Dishman who conducted the study wanted to see who was more engaged, males or females, during kissing.

"Prior research primarily used surveys to gather subjects opinions after they kissed." But Dr. Dishman says they measured each participant's brain with an EEG device while they were actually engaged in the kissing. 

In case you want more details, the study used newly-married couples and after "'hooking them up with the device" they were given privacy and instructed to kiss during the middle 10 seconds. The EEG data measured engagement, distractions, and cognitive load. 

Each person was fitted with an EEG device to measure brain activity. After calibration with the device, the couple was given privacy for 30 seconds. They were instructed to kiss, as desired, during the middle 10 seconds. The EEG data was then analyzed for engagement, distraction, and cognitive load. What the lab found was surprising. Dr. Dishman says he expected that "males would be more engaged in the pre-kiss stage." But he says what they found was women were "more engaged during that stage (pre-kiss stage) than there were during the actual kiss." He adds "male brains had to work harder in order to kiss." He says they don't know scientifically why, but says "it may be that the act of kissing comes more naturally to females than to males."

And appropriately on Valentine's Day, UVU will have a newlywed couple repeat the study to show a live reading of brainwaves as they kiss. 


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