International Left-Handers Day: 7 things that make lefties’ lives just a little more difficult

Local News

A Jimi Hendrix owned and played left-handed Fender Startocaster guitar (estimate USD $300,000-$500,000) (L) and an Eddie Van Halen designed and stage played Charvel Art Series electric guitar (R) are displayed at a press preview of Julien’s Auctions Presents Icons And Idols: Rock ‘N’ Roll, Hollywood and Sports, November 23, 2020 in Beverly Hills, California. – The auction will take place live and online from December 1-4. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP) (Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

(ABC4) – In the United States and many other countries, Friday the 13th is superstitiously viewed as an unlucky day that prompts some to use extra care to avoid misfortune.

But Friday, August 13th also marks a lesser-known holiday – International Left-Handers Day. Making up roughly 10% of the population, lefthanders are sometimes “left” out when it comes to the design of everyday objects.

Here’s a list of things that are difficult just a little more difficult for all the southpaws out there.

  1. School desks: School desks that have the table attached to the chair are often made for righthanded people with the armrest on the right side. Though there are sometimes lefthanded desks, there are usually far fewer, which limits lefthanders’ seating options.

2. Scissors: Left-handed scissors are never as readily available as righthanded ones, which are pretty close to impossible for lefthanders to use.

A person cuts paper with scissors for left-handed users in the Salle du Pont du Buy in Brive-la Gaillarde, where writing and cooking workshops were organised and objets for the left-handed were sold, at the occasion of the French National Lefties’ Day on August 23, 2015. AFP PHOTO / DIARMID COURREGES (Photo credit should read DIARMID COURREGES/AFP via Getty Images)

3. Spiral binders: The spirals get in the way when lefthanders try to write on the correct side of the page.

(Photo credit should read PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP via Getty Images)

4. Can openers: With left-handed can openers few and far between, many lefties just adapt to using right-handed ones.

5. Writing from left to right: The writing gets smudged and leaves marks on your hand, especially when using pen, chalk, or marker.

A person draws loops in the Salle du Pont du Buy in Brive-la Gaillarde, where writing and cooking workshops were organised and objets for the left-handed were sold, at the occasion of the French National Lefties’ Day on August 23, 2015. AFP PHOTO / DIARMID COURREGES (Photo credit should read DIARMID COURREGES/AFP via Getty Images)

6. Computer mouse: Finding a lefthanded mouse at school or work can be tricky and lefties sometimes need to configure a mouse from righthanded to lefthanded on their computer. Most lefthanded people just get used to using righthanded ones.

(Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

7. Debit/credit Card Readers: When making a purchase, lefties often need to switch the card to their right hand to swipe. Using a chip reader makes that a little easier, but forget it if you need to sign your name on the screen and the cord is on the right.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Editor’s Note: This story is based on the experience of the author. If we’re missing anything, let us know!

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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