‘Happy Death Day,’ ‘Blade Runner 2049’ reviews and more on DVD/Blu-Ray Tuesday

Local News

Film Critic Tony Toscano, joined GMU’s Brian Carlson, this morning for DVD/Blu-Ray Tuesday. Tony says some pretty good movies are hitting shelves today, and we are taking a look at 3 of them.

The Snowman

When an elite crime squad’s lead detective investigates the disappearance of a victim on the first snow of winter, he fears an elusive serial killer may be active again. 

With the help of a brilliant recruit, the cop must connect decades-old cold cases to the brutal new one if he hopes to outwit this unthinkable evil before the next snowfall.

“The Snowman” keeps the audience on the edge of their seats throughout most of the film. The film is purposely paced slow, but as the story twists it begins to come to a boil. 

“The Snowman” has a few problems with timing and some character development and the film is extremely graphic with blood and gore.

It gets a B and is rated R.

Happy Death Day

A teenage girl, trying to enjoy her birthday, soon realizes that this is her final one. That is, if she can figure out who her killer is. 

She must relive that day, over and over again, dying in a different way each time.

Can she solve her own murder?

The film is at its best when the lead character “Tree,” played by Jessica Rothe, is uncaring and unsympathetic to her fellow students. But when the story turns sentimental, the film loses it’s edge. 

Earlier this year the film “Before I Fall” used this plot devise but was pretty much humorless in its execution.

“Happy Death Day” finds a balance between thrills and humor, but doesn’t maintain its equilibrium for very long.

“Happy Death Day” is a mostly a watchable film but it will not make you forget “Groundhog’s Day,” nor will it stick in your mind longer than the walk to the kitchen. It gets a C and is rated PG-13.

Blade Runner 2049

In the sequel to the cult classic, thirty years have passed, and a new blade runner unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. 
The discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard, a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years.

“Blade Runner 2049” is a stunningly shot, cinematic feast. The style of the photography remind the viewer of the original’s style and symmetry. The film, like its predecessor, is slow-paced and deliberate. 

But “Blade Runner 2049” falls short as the story simply does not know what to do with its characters. The script meanders and sputters never really coming to the boil fans of the original are expecting. 

Instead, the film runs out of gas and coasts to a stop, leaving the audience with the feeling something’s left undone.

In the end “Blade Runner 2049” is a wonderful example of cinematic eye-candy with little substance backing it up.
It gets a C and is rated R. 

For more on Tony Toscano and other films, visit his Facebook page: Talking Pictures.

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