6 Utah gems that not enough people visit

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UTAH (ABC4) – Utah is about 350 miles long and 270 miles wide. How much of it have you discovered?

In the era of COVID-19 and quarantine, why not take some time to yourself and see what the state of Utah has to offer?

Here are 6 Utah gems that more people should definitely go out to see.

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Flaming Gorge Reservoir, Dutch John

Flaming Gorge Reservoir is a huge reservoir, providing an outstanding opportunity for boating, fishing, skiing, jet skiing, house boating, and other water sports.

Three full-service marinas offer launching, storage, and maintenance facilities.

According to a Utah adventure site, the reservoir surface water is cool even during the heat of summer. That means the reservoir provides excellent habitat for trout and it is invigoratingly cool for water skiers.

“Flaming Gorge is famous for its trophy lake trout. A good number of 30+ pound fish are caught each year. The Utah record went 51 lb 8 oz, and there may yet be a bigger one swimming in the reservoir. Fishing is also very good for rainbows, brown trout, kokanee salmon, and smallmouth bass,” they add.

Yant Flats, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Yant Flats could be pinned as Utah’s own copy of The Wave in Arizona. This gem is open to anyone willing to visit! Bring plenty of water, and don’t forget your camera!

According to Hike St.George, Yant Flat is one of Southern Utah’s little gems that it seems you have to be from out of town to know anything about! This hiking trail takes you across a quick mile of the lower forest at the base of Pine Valley Mountain, and then spits you out onto some of the most incredibly colored sandstone formations that exist on this earth! There are two main areas of exploration and you can easily spend a couple of days hiking across the candy-like swirls.

Spiral Jetty, Great Salt Lake

Created in April, 1970, this outdoor art is located on the northeast shores of the Great Salt Lake. It’s considered the most compelling of sculptor Robert Smithson’s work.

Robert Smithson’s earthwork Spiral Jetty (1970) is located at Rozel Point peninsula on the northeastern shore of Great Salt Lake. Using over six thousand tons of black basalt rocks and earth from the site, Smithson formed a coil 1,500 feet long and 15 feet wide that winds counterclockwise off the shore into the water. In 1999, through the generosity of the artist Nancy Holt, Smithson’s wife, and the Estate of Robert Smithson, the artwork was donated to Dia Art Foundation.

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West Desert

According to the Utah adventure site, the western portion of Utah is a unique area very different from other parts of the state. It is mostly an arid desert accented by low mountain ranges. Water is scarce. The Bonneville Salt Flats are included in the west desert area.

“There are few towns in this part of the state. Few gas stations; few motels. You won’t even find very many campgrounds. You can expect to drive 100 miles or more between communities. Often, roads are dirt and you can sometimes go many hours without seeing another vehicle,” the site mentions.

Solitude is an important attraction here. But it also brings risks. If you drive the backroads here, you need to be self-sufficient. Make sure you start with a full tank of gas. Carry food and water – more than you think you will need. Make sure your vehicle is in good mechanical condition and you have a good spare tire (and jack).

Fantasy Canyon

Based out of Vernal and only 10 acres in size, this place will definitely have you feeling lost among gargoyle-like sand structures.

A definite must-see, for anyone in search of an out of this world experience!

Things to do there:

  • Search for unique structures
  • Discover hidden caves
  • Hike along high scorched dunes
  • Collect pieces of petrified sand

To head to this unique park, just enter Fantasy Canyon into a navigation app.

Old Irontown, Utah

Old Irontown is allegedly one of the most haunted ghost towns in Utah.

“Some consider Old Irontown to be a haunted ghost town because a lot isn’t known about this remote area in Dixie National Forest. In the 1870s, a few iron companies tried their luck in this part of Utah. However, due to the economic downturn at that time, the iron companies didn’t stay around very long. And, by the 1880s, all residents left the town,” informs another adventure site.

According to the site, Old Irontown’s unique history makes it an off-the-beaten-path stop for archeological buffs visiting Utah. Thirty years ago, the site was also added to the National Register of Historic Places.

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