SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (ABC4) – There’s a reason skiers from all over the world come to Utah, and it’s more than just the snow. 

Our mountains are big and numerous

In Utah, we live life elevated. Most of the state’s residents live within 15 miles of the Wasatch Mountains. Utah’s tallest mountain is King’s Peak, with an elevation of 13,534 feet or 4125 meters. Our mountains can be enjoyed nearly year round, depending on the hike or mountain. Plus, don’t forget to explore the backcountry to ensure minimal to no crowds, great views, and much-sought terrain options. 

Get a multi-resort pass

If and when you do decide to go skiing, consider a pass. There are five different passes that could save you tons of money and get you a chance to try many of the ski resorts in that particular area. For example, you could pay $160 for a day pass at Deer Valley, or instead, you could pay $800 for the Ikon Pass and ski for five days, plus five days at Alta, Brighton, Snowbird, and Solitude. 

Epic Pass: $989, unlimited access to Park City and Snowbasin.

Yeti Pass: $649 you’ll get a one day pass for each of the 15 Utah resorts.

Mountain Collective: $509 for two days of skiing at Alta Ski and Snowbird, and also 50% off each additional ticket.

Fifth- and Sixth-Grade Passports: $45, one of the cheaper passes. This is specifically for fifth-graders. They get a chance to ski or ride three times at each of Utah’s 15 resorts, and sixth-graders get one day at each.

Ski in Beaver, Utah

After you’ve enjoyed the vast and highly trafficked resorts, consider Beaver, Utah as your next ski destination. This one is less known–and it’s one of Utah’s best-kept secrets. It’s a small, quaint ski resort in Northern Utah, and it’s family owned and operated since 1939. The benefits of this one? Less people and more affordable ski passes. 

Consider a later ski season

Utah’s got snow throughout the season, which can help minimize the number of skiers in a given area, but if you want to ski with fewer people, consider skiing in late spring. Some of the biggest storms happen after Christmas and after many of the crowds have gone home.