• On Good Things Utah this morning – We are diving right into this juicy conversation: Why one author is teaching her kids to be quitters: “The trick, I’ve learned, is to know when to dig deeper or when to quit digging altogether. If at first, you don’t succeed, try, try again!” “Winners never quit, and quitters never prosper!” There are many other adages with the same core message; this narrative proclaims one lesson above all others: quitting is to be avoided at all costs. But looking back, it’s clear that I’ve held onto things (friendships, jobs, sushi) way longer than I should have — all in the name of not being a quitter — and it wasn’t healthy. So, I’m teaching my kids that in some cases, the best option is to abandon what you’re doing and move on. Give up. Throw in the towel. Just quit. Contrary to popular belief, sometimes quitting is for winners. We’re taught from a young age that quitting is bad and shameful. The widely accepted belief is that success is only probable and possible for those who never give up, come hell or high water. Whether with sports, dreams, or even relationships, we’re taught that giving up is synonymous with failure and weakness. And yes, when you teach your kids that quitting is okay, the challenge is that they are more inclined to, well, quit. Do I want to teach my kids to give up at the first sign of frustration? Absolutely not, and I want to be very clear about that distinction. I certainly don’t want to raise kids that immediately surrender when things become challenging or they encounter a slight bump in the road. Making an impulsive decision to give up when things become arduous, don’t go as hoped, or simply become boring or uninteresting is no good, either.” Tune in to hear more or click here to read the article: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/parenting/i-m-teaching-my-kids-to-be-quitters-here-s-why/ar-AA13dnaL
  • Plus, Halloween season brings many fun traditions for families, like carving pumpkins, putting up spooky decorations and eating too much candy. Then, of course, there is the all-important costume selection process. From issuing strange requests to constantly changing their minds, kids don’t make the Halloween costume situation easy for parents. But at least they can turn to Twitter to find humor in the frustration and vent a little. We have the funniest tweets about kid’s costumes that we could find!
  • Hope you tune into these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on Good Things Utah.