• On Good Things Utah this morning – Sad news from Hollywood this morning, actor Leslie Jordan has died, PEOPLE has confirmed. He was 67 years old. “The world is definitely a much darker place today without the love and light of Leslie Jordan,” his agent David Shaul shared in a statement to PEOPLE. “Not only was he a mega talent and joy to work with, but he provided an emotional sanctuary to the nation at one of its most difficult times. What he lacked in height he made up for in generosity and greatness as a son, brother, artist, comedian, partner and human being. Knowing that he has left the world at the height of both his professional and personal life is the only solace one can have today.” Jordan died in a car crash in Hollywood, California, after an apparent medical emergency, TMZ first reported. The LAPD confirmed to PEOPLE that the accident occurred at around 9:30 a.m. local time on Monday morning.
  • Plus, dressing up as ‘old’ for Halloween? Here’s why you should reconsider: Casual ageism is “the gateway drug” that can lead to much bigger problems. It’s demeaning. That’s what Bette Ann Moskowitz thought when she saw a Pinterest photo of a child dressed up as “old” for a 100th-day school celebration, complete with a walker and tennis balls. “There were instructions from parents. You could make her look just like an old lady — all you have to do is put the wrinkles on,” Moskowitz told TODAY. A former ombudsman for long-term care patients and the author of the book “Finishing Up: On Aging and Ageism,” Moskowitz said that dressing up as old for Halloween, or any other occasion for that matter, is not only belittling but represents the kind of casual ageism found in nearly every corner of society. “What bothers me so much is that I believe that ageism, this kind of minor treatment, is the gateway drug to real ageism, to real elder abuse. This kind of minor stuff is just a stepping stone,” she said. The ladies are weighing in on this topic, tune in for more or click here to read the article: https://news.yahoo.com/dressing-old-halloween-heres-why-222032027.html?fr=yhssrp_catchall
  • And economically speaking, the signs pointed to a baby bust. But new research on U.S. birth rates during the pandemic upended that expectation. When COVID-19 hit in the early months of 2020, the nationwide birth rate had already been declining steadily for nearly 30 years, hitting a historic low in 2019. Then the pandemic introduced a historic moment of uncertainty, followed by a lockdown that brought with it a global recession. So it was no surprise when a range of research entities announced in 2020 and 2021 that the U.S. was experiencing a baby bust based on initial numbers. In December 2021, Brookings calculated that there had been 60,000 “missing births” between October 2020 and February 2021 alone. Given precedent, such as past economic downturns—which tend to lead to lower fertility rates in response to financial constraints on families—and health crises, these predictions were not unfounded. This week, however, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) released a working paper that instead shows evidence of a “COVID-19 Baby Bump” for some groups. Hope you join us as we dive into these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on Good Things Utah!