• On Good Things Utah this morning – Labor experts say a radical career shift every decade or two can be good for both workers and employers. Greg Wilson spent much of autumn 2021 peering out from behind his laptop as his wife and their three small children headed off to the zoo or a playground near their St. Louis home, returning hours later, bubbly and smiling. “I kept getting jealous,” says the 43-year-old. “They were having fun every day, and I wanted to join them.” But as program manager at a large financial brokerage, a line of work he’d entered in his twenties, Wilson felt he couldn’t take time off. So last November, he quit to start writing a lifestyle blog. Wilson’s restlessness appeared right on schedule, says Allison Gabriel, professor of management and organizations at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She’s one in a growing chorus of psychology and labor experts who suggest that workers redefine “career” as a dozen or so years in a field, followed by reevaluation and rerouting. “We’re seeing people decide 10 or more years into their careers that they want to try something completely new,” she says. Tune in for more or click here: https://www.fanverse.org/threads/why-you-should-quit-your-job-after-10-years.1263673/
  • Plus, are you feeling down? These acts will make you feel more optimistic right away.” But being an optimist, Chopra stressed, does not mean ignoring the tough stuff or being positive 24/7. “In reality, that’s not possible,” she said. “A true optimist is really someone that is very keenly aware of the setbacks and roadblocks and the less than ideal situations. The caveat is they see them as temporary and something that they have the ability to overcome.” While some people may consider themselves born optimists or pessimists, Chopra said she likens optimism to a muscle that can be strengthened with practice. Her new deck of activity cards, “Things Are Looking Up,” offers 52 actionable ideas for living more optimistically.
  • And women are still hiding Botox from their husbands, but why? Stefanie Schmit decided seven years ago after seeing lines on her forehead that it was time for Botox. She was 35 at the time, and even though she told friends, she ultimately kept her decision from her husband. “I just felt like I couldn’t justify it,” the marketing executive says. “I’m getting my nails done, my hair done, and then on top of that, I was going to spend $350 every three to four months? That’s a lot of money.” She also worried that her husband wouldn’t approve. “He already didn’t think I should be coloring my hair. He doesn’t think I need to go to any length to change my appearance, that I’m already perfect,” she says. “While that’s an amazing and beautiful thing, I wanted to do this for me.” It’s a sentiment shared by a lot of women who increasingly view Botox as a form of self-care, not something they’re doing to appear more desirable to their significant other. Still, Botox remains a complicated issue for many women—while they aren’t necessarily doing Botox to please their partners, they’re fearful of judgment.
  • At the end of the show – Your urine can tell you a lot about your health! Before you flush, take stock of what’s in the toilet bowl. When taking a trip to the bathroom, you probably don’t notice your pee’s appearance or smell most of the time. Typically our urine is made up of 95% pure water and 5% other compounds. For the most part, “normal” urine doesn’t smell if you’re healthy and well-hydrated. Additionally, urine is typically a light yellow color, similar to lemonade. (If it’s clear, you may be drinking too much water.) However, when there’s something going on, odors can start to arise and pee may change color. We are sharing changes that might warrant a trip to the doctor’s office! Hope you tune in to these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU.