• On GTU Hour 2 this morning – We want to help you save money this morning – it’s our Thrifts and Deals Show! Thrifting is a practice that has existed for decades, but its acceptance has changed over the years. When thrift shopping initially began, it didn’t receive the same love and celebration that it gets today. Many people saw it as entirely unsanitary to purchase clothes from thrift stores. This was primarily due to how many consumers frowned on buying used clothing. Over time, we can notice the shift in acceptance. Many young people are even advocating for thrift items. So, why is thrifting so popular now? In this article, we’ll examine the rise of thrift shopping. This includes peeling the layers of the fashion industry, consumption patterns, style preferences, and of course, climate change issues.
  • Plus, one author talks about working through perfectionism: “Throughout my time as an excellence-seeking perfectionist (meaning I have a high level of standards for myself and the people in my life), I have found that being perfect isn’t a strength, it’s a weakness. It’s important to have a reality check with yourself and learn how to stop being a perfectionist — it’s not good for your mental health! So is perfectionism a mental disorder? While perfectionism itself isn’t recognized as a mental disorder, people who struggle with perfectionism oftentimes experience comorbid mental health issues. If you’re struggling with anxiety, depression, or eating disorders, perfectionist thoughts could make those illnesses worsen. The other kind of perfectionists (failure-avoiding) are concerned with their own desire to succeed for fear of not being good enough in the eyes of others. Perfectionist tendencies can cause you to not be able to achieve your goals, practice negative self-talk, and have too high standards. Deena tells us the steps to take for help.
  • And as summer winds down and a new school year begins, kids, educators and parents all have a lot on their minds. They may be dealing with fears about school shootings, concerns about teacher shortages and COVID-related disruptions or the fallout from harmful legislation, like Florida’s Don’t Say Gay bill or Stop Woke Act, just to name a few. And then, of course, there are also the normal jitters that a new school year can bring. To help make the transition back to the classroom a smoother one, we asked teachers what they wish parents and caregivers would do before the first day of school. (And if your kiddo is already back in school, it’s not too late to address some of these things!) Here’s what they told us:
    • Practice the school routine ahead of time.
      • “In the weeks before school starts, take time to practice wake-up time, the morning routine that you have at home and school bedtime. This is important because, for some students, the transition to a school schedule can be extremely difficult. Giving them the opportunity to practice the routine allows them to get comfortable, feel the routine in place, and it allows time for your family to discuss or work on any frustrations that may arise before it is time to actually go back to school.” — Tamara, an educator in Colorado and creator behind @ifpencilscouldtalk on Instagram
    • Check in with your child emotionally.
      • “The first day of school can bring a rollercoaster of emotions, especially if it’s the first day at a new school. Check-in with them about their concerns, feelings, questions and reservations. If they have a concern or question, consider how you can alleviate this before the first day. If you’re unsure of how to do so, reach out for help to other school community members.” — Staci Lamb, a teacher in Maryland and blogger at The Engaging Station
    • Let them know it’s OK to be nervous.
      • “Before starting school, it’s important for you to make space for their feelings. ALL their feelings. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Help them understand it’s OK to be scared and that their teacher is probably scared, too. This helps them validate their feelings and know that it’s OK to feel however they feel.” — Lindsay Sauer, teacher and creator behind @sweetnsauerfirsties on Instagram
  • At the end of the show – Do you always wish you were the person picked for that First Class flight upgrade? Flight attendants say if you want to move up, you have to dress the part! Nicea shares their advice for airport attire. We hope you join us for these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on our special Thrifts and Deals Show.