• On Good Things Utah this morning – Are we really debating the use of emojis? Yes, we are, and here’s why: In an era where technology is ever-evolving, so is our understanding of how to use it — and this includes supplemental elements, like emojis. Something that was once thought to be a fun addition to texting or messaging has now become a highly contested topic between generations, and recent debate has spurred from one conversation on the internet pertaining to a commonly used emoji: the thumbs-up. Several months ago, a Reddit user took to the platform to ask if anyone else felt “unsettled” by the use of the thumbs-up emoji, sharing an example of workplace messaging conversations. “Most people at work use the ‘thumbs up’ reaction all the time,” the person wrote. “I don’t use it much. I either ‘heart’ reactions or reply even if it’s a short “Great!” or “Thanks!” (I also feel like I use too many exclamation marks, but that’s a different story). Anyway, I think it’s normal to ‘thumbs up’ messages, but I still feel like it’s such an unsettling response. Does anyone else feel this way?” This Reddit thread is an example of the rising generational debate that spans far beyond the thumbs-up emoji. Are certain emojis perceived in a context that’s anything other than literal? Short answer: Yes, depending on who — or perhaps what generation — you’re asking. Can the ‘thumbs-up’ emoji be seen as passive aggressive The original Reddit post titled, “Am I not adult enough to be comfortable with the ‘thumbs up’ emoji reaction?” got a shocking amount of replies from both ends of the spectrum. Tune in to for more emojis that are now being cancelled or click here: https://www.today.com/news/news/thumbs-up-emoji-debate-rcna52089
  • Plus, it’s never too late to follow your dreams, even in the modeling world. It’s not one typically known for its progressive stances on age. But, bit by bit, models who are well into their mature years are getting their start in the fashion industry. São Paulo-based Setsuko Saito, aka Rosa Saito, is one of those people. At age 68, she was approached to be a model. It took a year of convincing—twice by a modeling agency and once by a photographer—but Saito finally decided to give it a shot. She hasn’t looked back and is thriving as a model years later, now at 71 years old. Prior to modeling, Saito had long been taking care of others. At age 22, she was a caregiver for her mother, and in the year 2000, her husband died and she became the sole parent to their three children. Part of what spurred her to try modeling was the fact that had been “dedicating herself to someone else” for so long. She didn’t want to live with regrets. “If I don’t try,” Saito thought, “I’ll never know.” Donning her long, silver hair and striking elegant poses, Saito is a natural. She’s a versatile model and appears in editorial, marketing, and even high-fashion photo shoots. Saito is also no stranger to the runway and has walked in São Paulo fashion week. She takes on new projects based on her spirit of adventure, which has nothing to do with age. “I keep learning and I feel that the more I learn, the less I know. Surely time passes, but what is time, my God in heaven? If I were to give my soul an age, I would give it 22.”
  • We hope you tune in as we dive into these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on a Friday edition of Good Things Utah!