• On GTU this morning – A body temperature expert explains why some people are always freezing! And there’s a scientific reason that it’s more common for women.
    • You wear extra chunky sweaters. You’ve never met a mitten you didn’t like. You may even keep a lap blanket at work. You’re one of those people who is always cold. And you are not alone. Inside or outside, you just can’t seem to get warm. This characteristic of yours manifests itself in extra blankets, wild heating bills, and enough complaints that you start going hoarse. But surely there’s a scientific reason as to why some people are always cold, right? It can’t just be random chance that has doomed you to a life of perpetual shivers. I reached out to an expert to learn more.
  • Dr. Christopher Minson is a professor in the department of human physiology at the University of Oregon. One of his primary research interests is thermoregulation, that’s how the brain and body interact and adapt as we heat and cool. Plainly put, he is the perfect guy to answer a few questions from #TeamCold. So what is actually happening in the body when a person gets chilly?In the simplest of terms, feeling either cold or warm means that the temperature “set point” of the body is being challenged by thermal inputs throughout the body, including in the brain, the blood, the spinal cord, our organs, our muscles, and our skin. Part of our brain collects all of those thermal inputs and essentially compares them to what body temperature it wants to hold. So if your skin temperature is lowered, even though the rest of your body is still at a comfortable set-point, you will feel cold — in some cases, cold enough to make behavioral changes like putting on a sweater.
  • We hope you join us as we dive in (with a jacket) to these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU Hour 2!