• On Good Things Utah this morning – Summer means families are more spending time in and around the water: Pool parties, beach days and boat rides are all more common this time of year. As temperatures heat up, brushing up on water safety is crucial for everyone, but particularly for parents of young kids. According to the CDC, drowning is the second leading cause of death for kids ages 1 to 4. In addition to educating yourself on drowning prevention (more on that below), there’s a little-known factor to consider when taking your kids swimming this summer — the color of their bathing suits. Nicea tells us what colors to consider when it comes to safety for your kids in the water.
  • Plus, should your kids get to decide their own hair color? One therapist says yes. and here’s why: Giving kids hair autonomy is a great way to show the you trust them and love them unconditionally. Giving your children full autonomy over their appearance is one of the greatest gifts you can offer as a parent, but it’s admittedly sometimes easier in theory than in practice — especially when your tween says they want to dye their hair a rainbow-colored hue or try out a totally drastic haircut. You might worry about whether or not they will actually like going from waist-length strands to a short, cropped cut or what others might say about your kid’s brand new brightly-hued ‘do. But Dr. Courtney Glickman, mental health therapist and founder of The Collective Healing Center, argues in favor of letting your child have full autonomy over their hair.
  • And Deena tells us how to survive that upcoming summer road trip with your kids. She says it boils down to 3 important things:
    • Snacks
    • Fun Car Games
    • Unique Stops
  • At the end of the show – We take an important health test. If you have difficulty standing on one leg, it could be a sign of something more serious than overdoing it at the office summer drinks party. Middle-aged and elderly people who cannot balance on one leg for 10 seconds are almost twice as likely to die within 10 years than those who can, research suggests. How well a person can balance can offer an insight into their health. Previous research, for instance, indicates that an inability to balance on one leg is linked to a greater risk of stroke. People with poor balance have also been found to perform worse in tests of mental decline, suggesting a link with dementia. We dive into this Hot Topic and much more this morning on GTU Hour 1.