• On Good Things Utah this morning – What you would do with all that money? No one has matched all six numbers and won Powerball’s top prize since Aug. 3, allowing Wednesday night’s jackpot to slowly grow for a nearly three months. The eighth-largest lottery jackpot will be up for grabs when numbers are drawn for an estimated $700 million Powerball grand prize. No one has matched all six numbers and won Powerball’s top prize since Aug. 3, allowing Wednesday’s Oct. 26, jackpot to slowly grow for nearly three months. Of course, the reason no one has won the giant prize is because the odds of hitting all the numbers are so miserable, at one in 292.2 million. The $700 million jackpot is for those who take an annuity option, paid out annually over 29 years. Winners nearly always opt for cash, which for Wednesday’s drawing would be an estimated $335.7 million before taxes.
  • Plus, one author says moms never get a day off and she’s absolutely exhausted. “When you’re a work-from-home mom, you’re always right there — and that’s the problem. I’m tired. The kind of tired that is a burden and not a badge of honor. Every morning, I wake up and wonder what unexpected parenting demands will derail me from my professional ones. I suffer from the stress and strain of one particular brand of exhausting parenting: being a work-from-home mom of school-aged kids. As a mom, I’m always on. It’s well-established that moms are the default parent, the ones who get the calls from school when a kid is sick or left something at home. Even when partners like mine work to share the load, moms end up managing the majority of scheduling, doctors visits, shopping, playdates, homework, and maintaining the mental rolodex of kids’ friends and their families. When our households became homeschools during the pandemic, things only got worse. While we tried to hold down jobs and our sanity, moms also averaged 7 hours each day monitoring and managing our kids while they did virtual school, played, ate, and lived life in lockdown. While that was happening, I left my job at an established organization to start my own consulting shop, making me directly responsible for building a business and meeting client needs on top of everything else. I feel pressure to work hard grow my clientele because the opportunities we want for our kids rely on two incomes. There are ever-increasing school fees, team sports, summer camps, healthcare costs, vacations, meals out, and toys and tech. I try my best to keep my work flexible, so I can somehow make it to 4PM practices or 9AM drop-offs. My job is not extra or optional, and yet it feels like society and school expects it to be.” If you want to read more click here: https://www.scarymommy.com/parenting/im-so-sick-of-being-the-on-call-parent
  • And growing up, actor Geena Davis’s neighbors thought she was crazy. After seeing her pretend to lead blades of grass into imaginary battle, a concerned neighbor called Davis’s mother to say there was something seriously wrong with her daughter. “Actually, there were a lot of calls to my mother to say that something must have been wrong with me,” Davis wrote in the new memoir “Dying of Politeness.” The book is the two-time Academy Award winner’s first, and chronicles her life, rise to fame and journey from “crippling politeness” to full-on “badassery.” “I was conditioned to think that I mustn’t ask for things, must never put anyone out; so trained to be insanely polite that I learned to have no needs at all,” Davis wrote.
  • We hope you tune in as we dive into these Hot Topics and so much more on a Thursday edition of Good Things Utah!