• On Good Things Utah this morning – Science says 92 percent of people don’t achieve their goals. Perhaps, most of them have never learned how to effectively set their goals. You can help your child learn the skill of goal-setting, which is critical for developing grit and just simply getting what you want out of life.
    • Other reasons WHY your child should learn goal-setting include:
      • —it teaches them to take responsibility for their own behaviors and learning
      • —it promotes a “can-do” attitude
      • —it forms a powerful lifelong habit
    • So how do you teach your kids to set their own goals?
    • Step 1: Let Your Child Choose Their “Big Goal”
      • If your child has a genuine desire to reach their goal, they are far more likely to be intrinsically motivated, driven, and ultimately successful. Instead of pushing your child to set a goal that you want them to reach, help them consider what they truly want to accomplish or achieve this year.
    • Ask questions like:
      • –What’s something you wish you could achieve?
      • –What’s a challenge you would feel very proud to overcome?
      • –What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?
  • Help your child brainstorm ONE major goal that they would like to achieve this year. Make sure the goal is specific, measurable, and trackable. For instance, avoid vague goals like, “I’ll pay more attention in class this year.” There’s no clear way to know when or if this goal has been achieved. Here are examples of measurable goals which are much more effective:
    • “I’ll take daily notes this year and review them each week.”
    • “I’ll score ten points higher in math this year.”
  • Your child needs to be able to recognize her progress toward their goal, so be sure it’s something specific and measurable.
    • Step 2: Discuss the Purpose of Your Child’s Goal
      • In order for your child to be truly motivated to reach their goal, they must understand their “WHY.” Why do they want to achieve this goal? Why does it matter? What is their purpose? In education, it’s long been clear that when students see a purpose for what they’re learning, they tend to perform better. Four 2014 studies found that this is especially true when students have a self-transcendent purpose for learning. This means that students are more successful when they understand that their learning can also benefit others.
  • Tune in as we share more and dive into this Hot Topic this morning on a Thursday edition of Good Things Utah.