• On Good Things Utah Hour 2 this morning – There’s no trout about it – Utah’s rivers and reservoirs offer some of the best fishing in the West. Magicians never give up their secrets and fishermen never share their favorite fishing holes. Then again, you can’t keep a whole river secret. How about we put you in the neighborhood and you find your perfect spot, only to be shared with your favorite child? Here are 6 great bodies of water for Utah fishers — both spinning and fly fishing. Before you go, check the Utah fly fishing reports for water conditions and access points. Tune in for the best spots or click here for more: https://www.utah.com/articles/post/6-best-fishing-spots-in-utah/
  • Plus, Salt Lake City’s proximity to amazing outdoor recreation almost eliminates the need to own a tent. Then again, there’s something pure and recalibrating about rolling out a mat and sleeping on the lumpy ground. And with so many amazing camping spots hiding around the Salt Lake Valley, the decision to get out and rough it gets a little less rough. Take a quick drive up the canyon, head out to the Great Salt Lake or make it a full weekend trip down to southern Utah.
    • Albion Basin
      • A short drive up Little Cottonwood Canyon will lead you to great camping at Albion Basin Campground.
    • Stansbury Island
      • Stansbury Island isn’t exactly an island — it’s only mostly surrounded by the waters of the Great Salt Lake — but it offers pretty incredible views at the sunrise or sunset.
    • The Spiral Jetty
      • First check out Spiral Jetty, one of the world’s preeminent works of land art, created by Robert Smithson on the coast of the Great Salt Lake. Then, since it’s a bit of a trek out there, you’d do well to set up camp nearby and let the aesthetic significance swirl around you overnight.
  • And the question that is dividing the internet and our hosts! Why do some people put eggshells back in the carton? “I always put mine back in the carton,” says Derree Kamp, a school librarian in Lewistown, Montana. “It’s less mess because if the shells drip, it stays in the carton and doesn’t get on the counter.” Kamp’s husband isn’t a fan of putting empty shells back in the fridge. But her daughter and adult granddaughter are — both telling TODAY Food they probably do it because they saw their mom do it. In Philadelphia, writer Matt Bell does it because he saw his boyfriend do it. “I was initially disgusted,” said Bell. “I was expecting rotten egg smell to emanate from the fridge but it never did.” These days, he saves empty shells in the carton because it saves him time as his garbage can isn’t close by and he doesn’t have a garbage disposal. He has to put the carton back in the fridge anyway, so why not just toss the shells inside? In Halifax, Canada, administrative assistant Rosie Smith does it because it’s more convenient for composting. “The carton and shells are all compostable, so it’s just easier to leave the shells in there than it is to save the shells separately,” says Smith. “They both end up in the same green bin anyway.” But … is it safe “Putting egg shells back in the carton with the remaining eggs and back in the refrigerator is not safe,” Mitzi Baum, CEO of the public health organization Stop Foodborne Illness, told TODAY. Baum, who has a Master of Science in Food Safety, believes it can lead to cross-contamination and the transfer of potentially hazardous bacteria. “Eggshells can have salmonella inside, both in the egg itself and on the outer shell,” explained Baum. “Putting the cracked, empty shells back in the carton increases the risk of contaminating the remaining eggs.”
  • At the end of the show – We end our GTU Camping and Outdoor Show with the perfect home video. Sprinklers in the summer aren’t just for kids – wildlife likes to cool off too! Hope you join us for these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU Hour 2.