• On Good Things Utah Hour 2 this morning – Thanksgiving brings loved ones together to unplug and share a special meal. This holiday is famously not always the most harmonious, however. From cooking stress to tense conversations to full-on blowouts, many situations can derail a Thanksgiving dinner. But there are ways to keep things peaceful and light, as well. We asked etiquette experts to share some common rude behaviors at big holiday gatherings like Thanksgiving, and advice for avoiding them. “Being together with family for holidays can be wonderful,” said Jodi R.R. Smith, president of Mannersmith Etiquette Consulting. “It can also be taxing. Taking the time to plan and think strategically can make the difference between enjoying the interactions and pure dread.” Here are the rudest behaviors that you should be aware of:
    • Not RSVP-ing
      • Headcounts matter for a big meal like Thanksgiving, so make sure you let the host know you’re coming in advance. “A holiday invitation of any kind should be sent out in advance, at least three to four weeks early,” said Diane Gottsman, an etiquette expert, author of “Modern Etiquette for a Better Life” and founder of The Protocol School of Texas. “And an RSVP should be sent back within the week it is received to give the host ample time to prepare.”
    • Ignoring The Schedule
      • “If you’re going over to someone else’s house for Thanksgiving festivities, make sure you know the schedule of events and plan accordingly,” Smith said. “Sometimes people invite you for noon and they’re not serving dinner until 4. Plan so there isn’t too much together time. Don’t be rude, but if you know that you’re walking into a difficult situation, it might be best to be acceptably late ― or leave on the early side.”
    • Bringing Dishes That Require Cooking
      • Thanksgiving hosts often invite guests to bring their own special dishes if they’d like certain foods included in the meal. But don’t assume this means you’ll have free rein over their kitchen. “Unless explicitly cleared with the host in advance, don’t bring any food that requires you to use their stove or oven,” said Nick Leighton, an etiquette expert and co-host of the “Were You Raised by Wolves?” podcast. “The host is busy preparing the meal and definitely doesn’t have extra space in the oven or on the stove for you.”
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