• On GTU Hour 2 this morning – Tennis superstar Serena Williams recently revealed that she struggled to bond with her unborn daughter. And it’s a topic that deserves more attention. While some women feel an instant bond with their unborn child, for others it can take until the birth or even months after the birth for that connection to take hold. There is no normal. “Not feeling an immediate connection can leave a person feeling as if something is wrong with them,” mental health professional Dr. Kryss Shane told TODAY Parents. “Much like romantic relationships, some claim they knew from the first moment, others took time to recognize the love,” Shane explained. “Every pregnancy is different.”
  • Plus, you may have heard of postpartum depression, but it’s time to get to know another related condition: perinatal depression. More general and encompassing a larger time period, perinatal depression refers to depression that occurs before and/or after pregnancy. (Postpartum depression, by contrast, only occurs after pregnancy.) The condition is now in the spotlight after Britney Spears shared her experience with perinatal depression during previous pregnancies. “It’s hard because when I was pregnant I had perinatal depression,” the singer wrote in an Instagram post, announcing her latest pregnancy with fiancé Sam Asghari. The depression, Spears wrote, was “absolutely horrible.” People “didn’t talk about it back then,” she continued. “people considered it dangerous if a woman complained like that with a baby inside her . . . but now women talk about it everyday.” Spears said that she’s thankful that it no longer felt necessary to keep that “pain” inside.
  • And suffer from anxiety? This could help! Whether they’re dealing with anxiety, stress, grief, isolation, or memory loss, countless people find solace in stuffed animals, weighted blankets, and other soft comfort objects. Researchers and product developers have noticed, and in turn have been creating products specifically designed to help alleviate certain ailments. There’s now a fluffy robotic seal for people with dementia, a weighted teddy bear for grieving adults, and a cushion that mimics breathing to calm people down. Because this is an emerging field, the science behind why certain objects soothe us is still being studied. But Dr. David Spiegel, associate chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, says it makes sense that people find comfort in these objects. “We know children love stuffed animals—they’re what we used to call a ‘transitional object’ between just being by yourself and being connected with another human,” he says. Objects like these likely play a similar role for adults. “It’s not surprising that humans can stimulate thoughts and feelings related to interpersonal contact with an inanimate stuffed object.”
  • In our GTU Parenting Moment this morning: Pop star Rihanna says she will not be having a gender reveal party. “No brunch, no blush tones. And no animal-shaped nothing,” Rihanna, 34, told Vogue. “Personally I want a party. I want everyone to be plastered and crawling out. And it’s got to be co-ed! Don’t put me on no wicker chair somewhere with gifts at my feet where everyone is staring at me.” The singer who just announced her pregnancy a few weeks ago, has been doing everything outside the box and says that suits her just fine!
  • At the end of the show – Mistakes men are making that make them look older. Guys listen up: accept your grey hair, trim your body hair and be careful of being stuck in the 80’s! Nicea shares the list that made us all laugh this morning. Hope you tune in for this Hot Topic and much more this morning on GTU Hour 2.