• On Good Things Utah this morning – Watching your children run gleefully from door to door on Halloween, accumulating piles of candy and occasionally snacking on their loot, may have you convinced that they’re experiencing a “sugar high.” This was probably a phrase you heard your own parents or other adults throw around whenever kids were full of sweets and being loud and acting — well, like kids. For decades, parents have pinned their kids’ wild behavior on sweet treats. But while the concept of a “sugar high” is common, there’s no scientific evidence that eating sugar, even in large amounts, actually impacts children’s behavior. “This myth is really persistent,” Dr. Janine Zee-Cheng, a pediatrician practicing in Indiana, told HuffPost. While there has been some research suggesting a link between sugar and kids’ behavior, such as this 1995 study that showed kids’ adrenaline levels rose more than adults’ did after eating sugar, other studies have not replicated these findings. Tune in for more or click here: https://www.paprclips.com/article-source/2115605/can-my-kid-get-a-sugar-high-from-too-much-candy.html
  • Plus, one author says don’t touch Halloween! Listen to this: “I have an unpopular opinion to share with the masses. Ready? Here it goes — everyone needs to leave Halloween on October 31. The holiday falls on a Monday this year, but Halloween should not be moved to a Saturday. Period. The end. Don’t agree? I get that, but please hear me out on this one. I am the first to admit that when Halloween falls on a weeknight, things can feel rushed and my kids are too wound up from consuming all things sugar-covered to fall asleep anytime before 10 p.m. (not exactly convenient for elementary schoolers), but I still stand firm in my belief that Halloween is Oct. 31 and we should all just leave well enough alone. People try all sorts of trickery to try to bump trick-or-treating to the weekend. Do I feel bad for that lady on Facebook who suggested that our neighborhood collectively move festivities to Sunday evening and got piled on by a bunch of hardcore Halloween-loving parents who just want one stinking Monday without homework or extracurriculars for their kids? No, I do not. Halloween is on Oct. 31 and that’s when Halloween is. Period.” Click here for more: https://www.romper.com/life/leave-halloween-on-october-31-you-literal-monsters-19257145
  • And author Colleen Hoover is dominating the bestseller charts. Her fans explain why they’re so devoted…”She kind of rips your heart out.” Hundreds of fans zigzagged their way along Rockefeller Plaza, standing in line for hours to get copies of Colleen Hoover’s newest novel, “It Starts With Us,” on Oct. 18, the day it was released. But the line didn’t start at 30 Rock for most fans of CoHo’s, the author’s nickname. CoHorts, as Hoover’s fans call themselves, told TODAY they traveled hours from Florida, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and several other states to attend the pop-up event (which Hoover, who lives in Texas, wasn’t even attending). Olivia Ortiz, 18, told TODAY she traveled from Tampa, Florida, on Tuesday morning so she could make it to the event.
  • And with our 20th birthday celebration upon us, we ask the question: What’s so special about birthdays? Your birthday only comes around once a year and should be celebrated for at least six major reasons. A birthday is a time when people acknowledge the anniversary of their birth. In many cultures, birthdays are celebrated with gifts, parties, or other special activities. Tune in for the important reasons to celebrate your birthday!
  • At the end of the show – James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines. “It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.” Hope you join us as we dive into these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU.