• On Good Things Utah this morning – Nicea is back from her rainy trip to Disneyland and she brought pictures and video from the most magical place on earth! Find out how she and her daughters navigated the pouring rain and still had time to try the churros, pickles and even watch the fantastical The World of Color.
  • Plus, parenting those teenagers can be a difficult task — and one that keeps changing as your teen matures. When you spend more time having yelling matches and pushing each other’s buttons, it’s time for a truce. We have six great ideas for starting the new year off on the right foot with your teen. If you thought parenting toddlers was a challenge, wait until they’re teens. No matter how patient and calm a parent you strive to be, teens are just a challenge to your parenting skills. Start the new year off with a fresh set of teen parenting tools and see if you can tame the teen beast. Deborah Gilboa, M.D. — also known as Dr. G — is a board certified family physician, parenting expert, writer and mother of four who loves to help parents increase their knowledge and follow the parenting instincts they already have. We asked Dr. G to share some New Year’s resolutions for parents of teens.
    • Share a hobby
      • “Ask your teen to make a list of five different activities that they would like to learn more about or do once a week or month with you,” says Dr. G. “Then choose one of those hobbies and put it on your schedules. Make this time an argument-free zone, treated like you would a friends-night-out, a safe zone for both of you to focus on a common task and enjoy each other.” In order to keep the momentum going, make the rule that you can each only cancel once in the next three months.
    • Let your teen make some mistakes
      • It’s hard to watch your teen make a mistake — but important for their growth. “We all want to protect our children, but none of us can protect adults from their own actions,” Dr. G shares. “As our kids are in this transition time, let them make some errors in judgment and then let them live with the consequences. This cycle — making a mistake, suffering consequences and then facing another decision — is crucial to building resilient adults and builds confidence too.” Stepping back and watching them figure things out may be difficult, but it’s necessary.
    • Put your teen in charge
      • Planning your family fun time for the new year? Resolve to let your teen take charge, and watch what happens. “Decide on a budget and a timeframe and then ask your teen to plan a trip for the two of you or for your family. When they ask why, explain that you’d just like to have fun together,” says Dr. G. “Give them a budget and a list of what it covers — lodging, food, transportation, entertainment. Then do whatever they suggest. They may be surprised at your compliance, and you’ll be amazed at the relationship building.”
    • Don’t judge out loud
      • Are you feeling a bit squeamish about that new friend with the glow-in-the-dark hair? Watch what you say to your daughter about her friend. Your teen is smart enough to know how you probably feel about her edgy pals, but unless they are truly a danger to her don’t engage in a debate. A better approach would be to ask more positive questions about the friendship — what they have in common, like art or music — or invite the friend over for dinner. Your teen will be surprised and also be making her own decisions about relationships.
  • Hope you tune in for these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on a Monday edition of Good Things Utah.