• On Good Things Utah this morning – When Clinique launched the fragrance Happy back in 1997, people in the beauty industry turned up their noses at a perfume designed to lift your spirits. This was the era when fragrance campaigns were all about being edgy and cool or seductively captivating, so the perky premise of spritzing on joy was initially seen as kind of hokey, and insiders doubted that the scent would catch on.
    • Of course, Happy proved all the skeptics wrong, becoming a huge success that remains a cult favorite to this day. Its enduring legacy might have something to do with the fact that it was the first perfume created with “mood mapping,” a technique originally developed by taste and scent manufacturer International Flavors & Fragrances that identifies how different aromas affect our emotions. Clinique’s iconic citrus-floral blend doesn’t just smell vibrant—it’s engineered to make you feel vibrant whenever you get a whiff. What began as a novelty approach to scent creation 25 years ago is now an integral focus of the fragrance industry. Many of the newest perfumes coming out contain notes that have been shown not only to help elevate your mood but also to soothe your soul, calm you down, or make you feel more grounded—feelings we could all use more of in these stressful times. “During the pandemic lockdown, scent became a pivotal source of calm and stimulation for many of us, from the comforting smells of cooking to transporting our minds elsewhere through scented candles and home fragrance,” says Dana Schmitt, a perfumer for Givaudan, one of the top perfume and flavor manufacturers worldwide. “This heightened our appreciation for scent as a mood catalyst. Now that we’re out and about again, we’re still using personal fragrance to achieve this effect.”
  • If the notion of misting on good vibes sounds a bit far-fetched, science suggests otherwise. Data shows that smell triggers 75 percent of our daily emotions, which might explain why perfume—which we used to wear primarily to smell good for others—is increasingly becoming part of our self-care. We hope you tune in to these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on a Thursday edition of Good Things Utah.