• On Good Things Utah this morning – While most people get all worked up about their actual Halloween costumes, it can be easy to forget to focus on the equally important candy-collecting accessory — the pail! Some costumes have obvious bucket accompaniments, like a Toto-toting wicker picnic basket if you dress up as a ruby red slipper-ed Dorthy from The Wizard of Oz. But other outfits are more open to interpretation, leaving costumed cuties a little clueless about what to carry. Leave it to McDonald’s to come through with a great dress-up solution and some pretty awesome nostalgia as they bring back its iconic Halloween Happy Meal buckets from 1986!
  • Plus, from Hocus Pocus to Halloweentown, your favorite Halloween movie may be based on the state you live in, new data has revealed. A recently released report on each state’s most-searched favorite spooky, Halloween kids’ movies has found what families across the country will most likely be watching this October. To identify each state’s most-Googled spooky movie, the team at USDish put together a list of kids’ Halloween movies rated PG or G, using an SEO firm to find the movies that had the highest keyword search ranking. From there, the company inputted the movie titles into Google Trends to find each state’s most searched movie. Here’s what the fun report found. The top contender was 2002’s Scooby-Doo movie, which topped the list as the most-searched movie in 13 states. (Its newest version, SCOOB! got mixed reactions on Rotten Tomatoes and didn’t make the list.) In second place was Coraline, which was found to be popular in 11 states. Classics Ghostbusters and Beetlejuice followed in third and fourth place. Other movies on the list included Hocus Pocus, which of course is a big hit in Massachusetts; Coco, which was found to be the top pick in New Mexico; ET and Halloweentown, which is Oregon’s top movie and fitting since the original movie was filmed in St. Helens, according to the report.
  • And an op-ed arguing adults shouldn’t high-five children has gone viral, leaving many parents and mental health experts to raise their eyebrows (and maybe a high-five) in protest. John Rosemond, a parenting columnist and author, argued in a recent opinion article for the Omaha World-Herald that adults shouldn’t high-five children because a child is not an adult’s equal. “I will not slap the upraised palm of a person who is not my peer, and a peer is someone over age 21, emancipated, employed and paying their own way,” the 74-year-old columnist wrote. “The high-five is NOT appropriate between doctor and patient, judge and defendant, POTUS and a person not old enough to vote (POTUS and anyone, for that matter), employer and employee, parent and child, grandparent and grandchild.” Rosemond went on to argue that respecting adults is “important to a child’s character development,” and a high-five “is not compatible with respect.” “The child who is allowed to high-five an adult has tacit permission to talk to said adult as if they are peers,” Rosemond wrote. “Do not wonder why, if you high-five your child, he often talks to you as if you are his equal.” To read more tune in or click here: https://www.today.com/parents/parents/adults-shouldnt-high-five-children-rosemond-says-rcna50670
  • At the end of the show – Are bananas really that healthy? Bananas are one of the most popular fruits in the world — for good reason. Bananas are one of the most popular fresh fruits in the world. Not only are they naturally sweet and affordable, they are also packed with nutrients. Although bananas get a bad reputation for their high sugar and starch content, this tasty tropical fruit is loaded with potassium, vitamin B6, fiber and prebiotics. Not to mention bananas can replace sugar in many baked goods. We hope you tune into these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU Hour 2.