• On Good Things Utah this morning – Dubai is known for its extravagant architecture and, if Moon World Resorts has its way, a new hotel is set to reshape the most populous city in the UAE. The Canada-based company plans to build four MOON resorts, with the first designated for Dubai. The 735-foot-tall replica of the Moon will include all the amenities one would expect from a luxury resort, as well as special experiences meant to replicate a visit to Earth’s satellite. The $5 billion project would feature both a “lunar colony” and “lunar surface” experience intended to bring space tourism down to Earth. According to the company’s founders, Sandra Matthews and Michael Henderson, the resort could accommodate up to 10 million visitors a year once completed. The lunar colony alone has capacity for 2.5 million guests a year, and it’s even projected to include a training platform for space agencies and astronauts.
  • Plus, to remember why travel is still so important, despite all the chaos, Travel Market Report recently asked readers a simple question—why do you travel? Here’s what they said:
    • To Trace Your Heritage
      • Many advisors talking to TMR said that their desire to travel goes back to trace their roots, something that had been trending with the emergence of DNA-testing kits even before the pandemic. “I love to see new cultures, meet the people, and see how they live. One of my main goals in travel has been to find all the places that my grandparents have immigrated from and meet family through my ancestry findings,” Bonnie Childs of Mukilteo, WA’s Cruise & Travel Experts told TMR.
    • To Follow Your Inspiration
      • For Dianne Moore, CTC, of Travel More! in Wisconsin, her desire to travel began with all the reading she did growing up. “I read mostly fiction and historical fiction; stories that were set in many locals around the world. I wanted to see those places close up and personal. And after almost 50 years in the travel business, I have seen many of them. Always new places to visit and explore though,” she said. For Beth Skypeck, an advisor with AAA Northern New England, travel was a second or third career choice, one that she only arrived at after taking a giant personal leap.
    • To Get Out of Your Comfort Zone
      • For so many, pursuing personal growth means getting out of your routine and out of what you’re used to. Taking a journey outside of your comfort zone goes hand in hand with travel. “I travel to see, taste, and experience new things. I love experiencing new cultures and putting myself out of my comfort zone,” Rachel Peters of St. Louis’ Brentwood Travel told TMR.
  • And now let’s talk rest after all that travel – the importance of resting your body is often overlooked in today’s busy lifestyles. It seems, as a society, we have promoted a culture of productivity, efficiency, and high energy lifestyles. While there is absolutely nothing wrong with any of those things, it’s essential that we don’t neglect rest. Having a well-rested body will keep your mind clear and focused. It will also keep your body feeling good and benefit your overall health. Figuring out how to balance rest with your everyday workload can be quite the challenge. We are here to help by offering up different ways of getting rest. Each of these methods can prove beneficial in your efforts toward routinely resting your body.
    • Sleep
      • The most obvious way of resting your body is through sleep. As you sleep, your body is given the chance to heal and repair itself. It plays a big role in promoting a healthy heart, which lessens the chances of heart disease. Sleep can also be a valuable tool in managing your hunger. Sleep deprivation decreases your leptin (a hormone that makes you feel full) and increases your ghrelin (a hormone that makes you feel hungry). Studies suggest that the proper amount of sleep is 7-9 quality sleep hours per night.
    • Naps
      • Naps are closely related to sleep, but they play an important role for those who don’t get enough quality sleep. If you’re burning the wick on both ends, or are having nights of disrupted sleep, naps can help you compensate for lost hours of shut-eye. 20-30 minute naps have been shown to improve alertness and focus. Longer naps, however, may have an undesirable effect of feeling groggy afterward. While naps don’t make up for inadequate sleep, they can be beneficial in improving mood, alertness, and performance when you’ve had a not-so-great night’s sleep.
    • Meditation
      • Another option for resting your body is through meditation. The practice of guided thought has been used for decades to reduce stress and improve concentration. Meditation has been shown to improve overall health, and it is very flexible, as it can be done nearly anywhere.
  • At the end of the show – We couldn’t do a Travel Show without quizzing our hosts about country names. Play along with us as we do a little geography test – (is anyone on set smarter than a 5th grader?) Tune in for these Hot Topics and more this morning on GTU Hour 2.