• On Good Things Utah this morning – Call it the Elsa Effect. Or maybe it’s just progress. But both Rachel Zegler and Halle Bailey— respective stars of the upcoming live-action Disney reboots Snow White (2024) and The Little Mermaid (2023) — said their “modern,” diverse versions of the iconic animated princesses will far less tethered to those age-old “true love” storylines. “In 1937 the cartoon Snow White And The Seven Dwarves was so focused on her finding true love, and it’s not even in her mind at all in this film,” Zegler (West Side Story), 21, told us Friday at Disney’s D23 Expo in Anaheim, where she was joined by co-star Gal Gadot (watch above). And while Eric (Jonah Hauer-King) will still be a major character in next year’s The Little Mermaid, Bailey says her Ariel also won’t be defined by a romantic attraction. “We keep a lot of the meat of the film that made us all fall in love with this film,” said Bailey, 22. “It’s really her, and her gumption. And just excitement for the life above her world. So it’s amazing, but it’s also updated with the current times.
  • Plus, the things that parents say to their kids can either encourage and give them confidence, or lower their self-esteem and hold them back in life. So how do we avoid doing the latter? As I researched and wrote my book, “Raising an Entrepreneur,” I talked to 70 parents who raised highly successful adults about how they helped their kids achieve their dreams. To my surprise, although it was an extremely diverse group — of races, religions, socioeconomic brackets and education — all the parents gave their kids the same messages every day. Some of them were tough love, while others offered positive wisdom:
    • “I CAN’T DO EVERYTHING FOR YOU.”
      • These parents were the opposite of “helicopter” parents (a.k.a. overprotective and very involved). Instead, they set clear expectations and trusted their kids to take responsibility. More importantly, they allowed natural consequences to occur. If their kid didn’t study and failed a quiz, for example, they used that as an opportunity for reflection and learning. When Robert Stephens, a former executive at Best Buy, was three years old, he took off all the doorknobs in the house. “My parents weren’t angry, they just told me I had to put them all back,” he said. Stephens became the “fix-it” guy in his family. Then, at 24, he went on to start Geek Squad, a repair company that he later sold for $3 million.
    • “DO YOUR BEST AND BE KIND.”
      • All of the entrepreneurs learned the importance of kindness when they were young. In 2006, Blake Mycoskie founded TOMS, which has given away over 95 million pairs of shoes. His company introduced the “one-for-one” business model, in which one needed item is given away for each item purchased. His mom told me that instilling compassion was an important part of bringing up her children: “We always adopted three or four families at Christmas through our church and bought clothes and toys that we delivered together to the kids.” This was always their “family policy — to help those less fortunate,” she said. “The kids have seen this practiced their entire lives.” For more tune in or click here: https://flipboard.com/@marceltougas/co-parenting-sckcgrarz/-/a-ag2yBnpaRImdlqar-86RiQ%3Aa%3A120171699-%2F0
    • We hope you check out Good Things Utah for these Hot Topics and so much more every morning at 9 am on ABC4.