• On GTU this morning – We are on the road, introducing you to Beaver County! This morning Surae and Deena are live at Eagle Point Ski Resort in Beaver County. Utah’s newest ski resort and quickly becoming a southern favorite with its 600 skiable acres, 40 runs, access to Tushar Mountain backcountry and terrain park. Tree-lined runs and blue skies abound. Enjoy small crowds and lots and lots of powder!
  • And the county of Beaver itself is brimming with colorful history, diverse geography, spectacular outdoor recreation areas, and friendly, accommodating residents eager to welcome tourists, new businesses, and residents to the area. Beaver County lies in the southwest region of the state. It encompasses an area of 2,590 square miles with a population of approximately 6,629. Some of the most beautiful and varied scenery in the West is found in Beaver County. It is the perfect area to locate your family or business. Beaver County is a year-round vacation destination retreat for families, history buffs, and outdoor enthusiasts. We are
  • Now for some Beaver County history, the first settlers came from Parowan in April, 1856. They built log cabins along Beaver River and began cultivation in the same area. The first town was laid out in the spring of 1858, and, with the river, was named for the many beaver dams found there. And one of the most famous outlaws got his start in Beaver County. Butch Cassidy’s life had more humble beginnings, as he was raised by Mormon pioneer parents in a remote cabin in Utah. Born as Robert Leroy Parker on April 13, 1866, he was the oldest of 13 children and grew up on a small ranch south of Circleville, Utah. Parker left home in his teens and supported himself by working as a farmhand on ranches and dairy farms. While working on one such farm he was mentored by a cattle rustler named Mike Cassidy and began using Cassidy as his own surname. Several years later, while apprenticing for a butcher in Rock Springs, Wyoming, he acquired the nickname “Butch,” and went by the name Butch Cassidy for the rest of his life.
  • Finally, why we should all support local businesses in Beaver and how to do it. First, travel with a renewed sense of awareness and an eye for community impact. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, now more than ever, small businesses need support from travelers near and far. After all, it’s the one-of-a-kind shops, galleries and eateries that give Utah’s cherished communities their unique flavor. If small businesses can’t survive an economic downturn, they’ll be replaced by large chains and communities will lose what makes them special. We are spending the next two hours showing you everything Beaver has to offer! Hope you join us for a special on the road edition of GTU this morning.