• On Good Things Utah this morning – We are taking our show on the road to the Leonardo museum in downtown Salt Lake City. And why is it so important to visit our local museums? Museums can increase our sense of wellbeing, help us feel proud of where we have come from, can inspire, challenge and stimulate us, and make us feel healthier. With society facing issues such as poverty, inequality, intolerance and discrimination, museums can help us understand, debate, and challenge these concerns. They can also enhance everyone’s life chances by breaking down barriers to access and inclusion. Museums are doing this through active public participation, engaging with diverse communities, and sharing collections and knowledge in ways that are transforming lives. Museums of all sizes, with collections ranging from fine art to social history, are changing lives – often in partnership with community groups, health charities and other third sector organizations. The Museums Association (MA) is campaigning for museums to develop their role as socially purposeful organizations and there is growing evidence that they are working with their communities and delivering positive social impact.
  • Plus, how is your mood on a Thursday? There are a million things that can cause our mood to rise and fall throughout any given day. Whether or not we show it, and no matter how hard we work to keep calm and carry on, our emotional responses can run widely outside of our control. It’s an unavoidable and entirely human thing to react to what goes on around us. Our feelings don’t have to be rational to show up. They’re instinctual, immediate, and can trickily be triggered by our past. They can make perfect sense or puzzle us when they arise. Adding to their mystery are the feelings on top of feelings — the harsh judgments that flood in from our own inner critic, for example, the guilt we feel for being angry at our 6-year-old for throwing a monster fit over screen time. The embarrassment we feel over our disappointment when a date falls through. The resentment we experience when we feel anxious and overworked either at home or in the office. The shame we have around our sadness when it’s particularly close to the surface for no particular reason. The complexity of our daily emotions makes it hard to suggest a one-size-fits-all approach to feeling better. However, there are some ongoing practices we can adopt that orient us toward more resilience. When asked for a more immediate method for what to do to get out of a bad mood, these are pretty much the main things I advise:
    • Embrace Self-Compassion
      • The first thing we need to do is suspend any judgment around our feelings. As I said, our immediate emotions are largely outside of our control. This doesn’t mean they have to overpower us or that we can justify our behavior because of them, but it does mean that we shouldn’t be cruel or critical toward ourselves for having them. When we have a big reaction, we should try to meet that reaction with self-compassion. Self-compassion, as defined by leading researcher Kristin Neff, comprises three things:
    • Self-kindness over self-judgment
      • Mindfulness instead of over-identification with thoughts and feelings
    • Common humanity over isolation and feeling different and alone
      • Self-kindness means meeting ourselves where we are, having compassion for the fact that we’re struggling, and offering ourselves time, space, and patience around our emotions. Mindfulness, which I’ll get into more later, is all about letting our thoughts and feelings be there without over-attaching to them or tending to them like fires we need to put out immediately. Having a more mindful approach helps us avoid falling into a pattern of rumination or a feeling of being totally overwhelmed.
  • And actor Ryan Reynolds revealed Tuesday that a colonoscopy he underwent in jest – after losing a bet – revealed a polyp. His doctor said the procedure could have saved his life. “This was potentially lifesaving for you,” his doctor, Jonathan LaPook, said in a video Reynolds shared. “I’m not kidding. I’m not being overly dramatic.” Reynolds chronicled the colonoscopy procedure after betting fellow actor and friend, Rob McElhenney, that he couldn’t speak Welsh fluently. After McElhenney, who created and starred in the sitcom, “Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” proved Reynolds wrong, the two friends created a video montage of their colonoscopies and anesthesia-layered recoveries. They used it as an opportunity to shine light on colorectal cancer screenings, with the video shot as a partnership with the organization, Colorectal Cancer Alliance and Lead From Behind. LaPook, a gastroenterologist with NYU Langone’s Colon Cancer Screening and Prevention Program, explained to Reynolds how colonoscopies can be “stunningly effective,” which proved true in the 45-year-old actor’s case. LaPook discovered an “extremely subtle polyp” on the right side of his colon. The removal interrupted “a process that could have ended up developing it to cancer and causing all sorts of problems.” We hope you tune in with us for these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU!