• On Good Things Utah this morning – In addition to smelling like a cozy October evening, this candle is super cute, displaying a shocked expression with wide eyes and outstretched arms straight out of a children’s Halloween special. When lit, it might look a little alarmed, but that only ups its cuteness factor — especially if it’s in the same room as these fuzzy sherpa ghost pillows from Target. If you’re looking for an even more charming addition to your fall-themed decor, the ghost also comes in the form of a Cuddle Boos Candle, a set of lovers connected in a sweet embrace — perfect for you and your boo to place on your coffee table, candy display, bathroom counter, or anywhere that needs a touch of Halloween spirit. If you do decide to add either of these spooktacular spirits to your Halloween decor, we recommend placing them on top of a plate or dish to prevent any ectoplasm ghostly remains from dribbling onto your furniture.
  • Plus, to say that the brain is a miraculous organ, and deserves your every effort to protect it and boost its health, is a tremendous understatement. Just a few amazing facts: weighing in at about three pounds, your brain basically has unlimited storage capacity, and the information within travels up to 268 miles an hour. Whether it’s taking a nap in the afternoon to improve your cognitive performance, or brushing and flossing every day to reduce your risk of dementia (really!), practicing a brain-healthy lifestyle should be part of your daily routine. And just as you can do things to boost your brain health, certain other choices you make may hurt your brain. Read on to find out the four worst things you can do for your gray matter.
    • Not getting enough vitamin D
      • Vitamin D is important for building and maintaining bone strength, and it also plays an important role in the nervous, muscle, and immune systems, according to MedlinePlus—and studies have found a link between vitamin D and brain health. “A recent meta-analysis… showed that maintaining adequate vitamin D levels significantly reduces the risk of developing Alzheimer’s,” advises Michael Dominello, DO, a radiation oncologist at Karmanos Cancer Institute. “It will also ensure your cognition is optimized on a day-to-day basis.”
    • Physical inactivity
      • A sedentary lifestyle is bad for your health in more ways than one. Studies have shown that it can have a negative affect on your heart health—and that’s not all. “Sedentary lifestyles increase all causes of mortality, double the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and obesity, and increase the risks of colon cancer, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, lipid disorders, depression and anxiety,” according to the World Health Organization (WHO). “Approximately 2 million deaths per year are attributed to physical inactivity, prompting WHO to issue a warning that a sedentary lifestyle could very well be among the 10 leading causes of death and disability in the world.” We now also know that physical inactivity can affect your memory. “Researchers found sedentary behavior is linked to thinning in regions of the brain that are critical to memory formation,” says Science Daily. So how do you transition from a sedentary lifestyle to a routine that includes physical exercise? “Start small with a goal of increasing your heart rate with physical activity (biking, running, swimming, or even brisk walking) for a minimum of 10 minutes daily,” says Dominello. “It doesn’t need to be a long, protracted workout, just commit to at least 10 minutes per day and be consistent!”
    • Lack of sleep
      • While it’s true that napping can help give your brain a boost, getting a good night’s sleep is still essential. “The proof is in the pudding; if sleep were nonessential, evolution would’ve eliminated it a long time ago,” explains Dominello.”Beyond the common sense of it all, there are plenty of data to support that human beings need seven hours of sleep per day, at a bare minimum.”
  • And Fall brings the excitement of the holidays and an abundance of activities that families can do together. When it comes to deciding what family activities can (and should) be done, the overwhelm can be great for many. Some families feel like they just aren’t doing enough and missing out on this special time of year. Other families are so busy bouncing around that they feel exhausted quickly and then enter into the next round of holidays already burned out. Laura Linn Knight, author of Break Free from Reactive Parenting: Gentle-Parenting Tips, Self-Regulation Strategies, and Kid-Friendly Activities for Creating a Calm and Happy Home suggests families make a “fall bucket list” to start. Tune in for some of the bucket list activities that she suggests, or click here for more: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/60-fall-activities-for-kids-and-families-to-enjoy/ar-AA12FX0n
  • At the end of the show – Should you start drinking something other than coffee in the morning? One woman says she did and here’s what happened next: “I drank warm honey lemon water every day for a year and saw mega change in my body Here’s what I learned, plus my honey lemon water recipe and the health benefits of drinking it. Until a few years ago, honey and lemon drinks were something I bought in a packet from the chemist when in the death-throes of a full blown flu. Naturally, those little packets didn’t help much, so I was skeptical when I started this whole crazy challenge. Of course, drinking real lemon juice and proper honey in warm water is a totally different experience, and with all the hype around it I embarked on a 12 month quest to see if it really was as miraculous as the trend says.” Tune in for more or click here: https://www.wholesometimes.com/heres-what-happened-after-i-drank-warm-honey-lemon-water-every-morning-for-a-year/ We hope you tune in for these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU Hour 2.