• On Good Things Utah this morning – Are we doing our kids a disservice when we make them specialize in sports too soon? One author says a resounding yes: “Sports meant so much to me, but they’ve changed completely since I was a kid. I was a lifelong soccer player starting with my town’s travel team, going on to co-captain my high school soccer team and play Division 3 soccer in college. I also swam, played tennis, basketball, ice hockey and lacrosse — a different sport or two every season, picking up new ones even through high school. I grew up at a time when kids could actually do this. They didn’t have to commit to one sport in 3rd grade and prioritize it over all overs. And I’m so glad I did, because being an athlete — not just a soccer player — taught me leadership, perseverance, teamwork, sportsmanship. It afforded me lifelong friendships and provided a deep foundation of confidence for adulthood. So much of who I am and what I have accomplished I owe to my years on the field, in the pool, on the court and rink. When I became a parent, I couldn’t wait for my kids to play sports, because I knew how deeply those experiences had shaped me. But I was wholly unprepared for what I would encounter in today’s youth sports. In just a generation, things had changed so dramatically — the intensity, time commitment, high cost, required specialization — that it wasn’t clear to me if my kids would benefit the same way I had. And I was only beginning to see then what has now become a common refrain in the media: frightening statistics about the impact of sports overspecialization. On the physical side, dangers to young athletes who overspecialize, like overuse injuries and reconstructions in kids barely starting high school. And on the mental health side, the scary rates of anxiety and depression amongst elite athletes, evidenced by the tragic trend of college athletes dying by suicide. Seemingly successful, happy student athletes who had achieved everything they were “supposed to” were buckling under untenable pressure, putting up such a brave front that oftentimes parents, coaches and teammates were shocked by the heartbreaking result of these athletes’ struggles.” Tune in to hear the ladies weigh in this morning.
  • Plus, major pharmacy CVS Health is officially lowering the price of menstrual products in 12 states (including Utah)—this includes CVS Health and Live Better tampons, menstrual pads, cups and liners. Menstrual products are already tax-free in 24 states. Consumers still pay tax on those products in Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Last week, the pharmacy chain said it would reduce the cost of CVS brand menstrual products by 25% on or before Thursday, October 13. “Too often period products are taxed as luxury items and not recognized as basic necessities,” CVS Health said. “Period products are taxed at a similar rate to items like decor, electronics, makeup and toys.” The changes are part of CVS’ “HERe, Healther Happens Together” initiative, which will include expanded women’s health services in its Minute Clinics.
  • At the end of the show – Halloween candy purchases in the United States each year can tell us a lot about where we are as a country, a snapshot of the national mood as we head into the holiday season. Halloween kicks off months of indulgent snacks and purchases, and we are apparently more ready than ever to embrace that this season: according to the National Retail Federation, we’re projected to spend a collective $10.6 billion on Halloween this year, a good chunk of which will go toward candy. Which candy is your state most likely to hand out to trick-or-treaters? Tune in as we share the sweet treats and dive into more Hot Topics on a Tuesday edition of GTU.