• On Good Things Utah this morning – Stephen Boss, a charismatic hip-hop dancer and television personality known as tWitch who rose to fame on the reality show “So You Think You Can Dance” before becoming a regular on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” died on Tuesday in a motel room in Los Angeles. He was 40. The death was ruled a suicide by the Los Angeles County medical examiner’s office. Mr. Boss joined “So You Think You Can Dance” in 2008 as a 25-year-old with a talent for popping — a dance form associated with hip-hop that involves isolating parts of the body with a staccato rhythm — and an ability to make the judges burst into laughter with his facial expressions and theatrics.
    • He soon found himself dancing unfamiliar styles like the waltz and the tango on national television, and he finished the show’s fourth season as runner-up. Later on in the series, Mr. Boss performed a hip-hop duet with Ellen DeGeneres — featuring him as a therapist in a sweater vest and her as his client — that would end up shaping the rest of his career. As a bubbly presence on TV who liked to wear a fedora and often broke into dance, Mr. Boss spent nearly a decade with “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” as D.J., guest host and, eventually, an executive producer. “I count on him to look over at and make silly jokes,” Ms. DeGeneres said in an episode this year, the show’s last. “He’s my pal, he’s my sidekick.” In a statement on Wednesday, Ms. DeGeneres said she was “heartbroken” over the death, calling Mr. Boss “pure love and light.”
  • Plus, when considering seeking help for your mental health, there are a few crucial items to figure out when starting therapy ― like finding a therapist who you trust, picking the best treatment modality, and figuring out a way to fit a session into your schedule. When it comes to the latter, the time you choose may be more influential than you think. Is it a bad idea to do it during your lunch break? Should you try to have your session at the start of the week? Here are some helpful tips:
    • Think about what you’re going to talk about.
      • It’s pretty difficult to say with certainty what topics are going to arise during a session, but if you have an idea of the subject matter that you plan on talking about, then that can be helpful in determining what time to schedule your next appointment. “If you are working on intensive trauma that leaves you drained after each session, it might not be the best to do a session right in the middle of the work day,” said Kristen Gingrich, licensed clinical social worker and certified drug and alcohol counselor. “However, if the only time you can find is in the middle of the day between different tasks, it’s important to make sure that you schedule time to help regulate yourself to make sure that it is not going to impact your day.”
    • Consider what processing looks like for you.
      • If you’ve had a therapy session during lunch at work and then had to hop on a meeting in the next hour, then you might have realized that you need more time to process your appointment since your mind is still actively churning thoughts. In those scenarios, you’ll want to try to schedule your therapy session for a time where you’ll have some time afterward to recollect yourself. “Try to schedule a bit of a buffer before and after to make the most of your session and give yourself space to process what you’ve just worked on,” said Dr. Nina Vasan, the chief medical officer at Real, a mental health platform. “Otherwise it can feel jarring to jump back into work or daily life.” It can be helpful to develop a post-therapy ritual if your schedule allows it to come down from heightened emotions. This can be as simple as taking a nap, going on a quick walk, reading your favorite book, mindfully drinking a cup of tea, or anything that helps ground you back into your daily routine.
    • Think about when you’re most productive.
      • After a long day at work, the last thing you might want to do is have another hour-long conversation. Even though it’s a voluntary activity, it can still be overwhelming for some people. If that sounds familiar, then the best time for a therapy session may not be at the end of the day.
  • We hope you tune in as we dive into these Hot Topics and so much more this morning on GTU.