‘Ugly Dolls’ fails to impress

Entertainment

Box Office Friday brings two movies for people on opposite ends of the age spectrum, and the one for kids failed to impress film critic Tony Toscano. Here is the full breakdown from his review on Good Morning Utah.

UglyDolls

Based on the children’s toys, the free-spirited UglyDolls confront what it means to be different, struggle with their desire to be loved, and ultimately discover that you don’t have to be perfect to be amazing because who you truly are is what matters most.

“UglyDolls’ tries to pass on the message that ‘being different is ok,’ but the film does it in such a poorly executed and bland way. The animation is lackluster and dingy, making the movie seem rather creepy, and the voice acting is like listening to a third-rate table read.

The story keeps hitting the audience over the head that ‘ugly is beautiful,’ but never talking about the beauty inside or that everyone has a special gift that makes them beautiful. In fact after several minutes of this film, I was put off by the constant use of the word ‘ugly,’ which like ‘beauty,’ is in the eye of the beholder and completely subjective.

The story aims solely at outward appearance and never really pushes more than the idea that even if you are less than perfect, someone may love you.

Pass this garbage by.

“UglyDolls” gets an F and is rated PG

Long Shot

In the film, protest journalist Fred Flarsky reunites with his first crush, Charlotte Field, now one of the most influential women in the world. As she prepares to make a run for the Presidency, Charlotte hires Fred as her speechwriter and sparks fly.

“Long Shot” is a mismatched comedy of an everyday ‘Joe’ going for the unobtainable woman and all through all the odds are against him, he still tries.

We’ve seen this story a few dozen times in such films as “She’s Out of My League,” “Moulin Rouge,” “Annie Hall” and even “Warm Bodies.” The differences between those films and “Long Shot” is Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron have very little chemistry on screen.

There is no overwhelming reason for these two to be involved, except for some nostalgic feelings from their childhood. Which isn’t enough to carry this comedy past the average.

Granted there were a few laughs in the film, but not enough to take the film higher than average.

“Long Shot” gets a C and is rated R.

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